Comments

I will be happy to post any comments or ideas here !

Hi Oddvin,

I have read your webpage with a lot of interest because I am belonging to the people doing weekend commutes to Powell River. I am doing this since only a few month but I am already so annoyed about the ferries and was searching the web for an answer why there is no bridge between Vancouver and the Sunshine Coast. I am from Germany and I grow up with a good connection system of roads, bridges and tunnels so I was wondering why there is no fixed link. So long story short, what can we do to support a fixed link? I read that a company is hired to prove the costs for a fixed link but is there anything that we can do to get this connector? Demonstrations? Flyers? I don’t know I feel I have to do something. If you have any idea let me know!

Best regards,

Elena

More Massey Tunnel       and more from The Province

Crossing alternatives

 Coast Reporter letters:

Fixed Links study smacks of  bias  –

Gabriola situation not comparable

Many verbal and positive comments this far.

Last 24 hrs. total 1.048 visits to the site and 1.319 views.

Last 24 hrs. total 5.564 visits and 6.784 views

2014-04-09 last 24 hrs. 3.934 visit and 4.745 views

2014-04-11 Sam:

I live on the Sunshine Coast and have lived here for last four years. I thought I would be OK with Ferry travel but am finding it is more of a pain than I imagined. We are contemplating moving off again because of dealing with the ferry situation. I would most gladly pay a toll for as much or even a bit more than the ferry costs if I could get on and off the coast when I wanted.
If I need to travel outside of Vancouver, the day is almost half over before I can even get on and off the ferry and through the valley. There are a lot of people here on the Sunshine Coast that live all along the water and use their homes for summer homes or weekend get aways from Vancouver or elsewhere. I think a lot of these people like the degree of seclusion that comes with having no road and having to take a ferry. Money isnt an object for many of these people as they live in the most expensive homes and property on the coast. The ferry system is a means to keep the way of life the same for them but these are not the people who truly live here on a year round basis and have to deal with the ferries 12 months a year.
I think if one was to get the comments from the majority of the working people here that have families here they would love to see a connector to Vancouver. The Ferry system is a cost that will never go away and will only get more expensive and likely less service as the costs increase. A connector with a toll that pays for itself is in my opinion one that makes a lot of sense. Yes, it may change things a bit over time but change always isnt a bad thing. Change happens in all communities as time goes on and many would not be happy to see things go back to yesterday.

Cameron Hood wants 3 lanes each way for safety. I agree, but I do not expect many accidents on a new road like this. A bi-cycle lane is also necessary.

Kim Miller, Powell River Chamber of Commerce: Thanks for sharing, I have shared on our Facebook page and with some local stakeholders. Everyone likes the concept, but financially is it viable?

 Actually it’s not completely out of the realm of possibilities. In the past we’ve talked about a road connector in the Port Mellon area to the Sea to Sky highway, which would eliminate the reliance on at least one of the ferry routes.

The BC Ministry of Transport has never completely rejected the idea. However, we do know there are some people on the lower Sunshine Coast that oppose having a fixed link to the lower mainland. They have valid reason, I’m sure.

Suggestion from HV, that The Province guarantee the same amount of funds as it cost to run the ferries, and let Highways build it.

Spencer Whitney: Your web site about a fixed link to the Sunshine Coast is unfortunately fueling the imaginations of the lesser-educated and idealistic of British Columbia via Facebook and other outlets. The misinformation and disregard for any kind of engineering research is insulting to anyone who lives near or visits Howe Sound.

The map upon which you scrawled your red pen is an arrogant expression of what you think is right. I can only picture you as a greedy land owner and “business developer” on the Sunshine Coast who would put this province in to more debt for your own personal gain. Luckily, the fixed link is not possible and we will all be saved from your madness.

Thank you for your response. I could well argue all your points, but just want to state that I am a pensioner, with absolutely no interest in land, property or any development. But, I have traveled some of this world, have a sound mind and entitled to solid professional opinions. Many great ideas are scribbled on a napkin, at least I used a chart. The environmental, engineering research and economic benefits, only start, if there is enough interest for this proposal. 

Aldina:     Oh please build this connector as soon as possible, it would be a benefit for many people

Thank you Aldina, I fully agree, Oddvin

Tom Wheeler: All access to or through our coastal communities would be wonderful I’m sure. What the Third Crossing Society hope to achieve with their concept of an overland road to connect between the North Sunshine Coast and the mainland at Squamish/Brekenridge is a transportation corridor between Vancouver Island and the Interior traveling the Duffy Lake to highway 1. ~~~ T W

I have read about your proposal and support it fully. Oddvin

Concerned Coaster : Having grown up on the Sunshine Coast, I must say that I vehemently oppose the concept of having any sort of “connector” to the true mainland. There are a number of reasons for why I feel this way… It would result in a rapid economic transition on the Sunshine Coast, yes, this could include financial profits, but at what cost? Housing prices will soar, big box stores will eliminate small, local businesses, and the entire feel of the region will change. Secondly, increased vehicle traffic to the Sunshine Coast and a lengthened drive to travel the journey will have a significant increase in CO2 emissions, thereby contributing to climate change. Lastly, the social dynamic of the Sunshine Coast would change. Ultimately, if people want an outdoorsy lifestyle with access to the city, they can achieve this through living in places like Squamish. People know what they’re committing to when moving to the Sunshine Coast and should realise that with this moves comes ferries and restricted travel. This is what keeps the Coast what it is – a healthy, vibrant, and close-knit community.

Thank you Concerned Coaster, you express very well the arguments against a road connection that I expected.
I like to respond for the sake of discussion. 30 years ago I felt I knew almost everybody on the ferries, now I seldom see anybody I know.
But I see locals going to town to do major purchases at Box stores in town. We should all support the local stores, yes, pay a little more, but you have a local store to do refunds and repairs. Food products is very important to purchase locally, mostly right at the farm gate. Fish from the dock sales. Use the Farmers Markets. Everything you find of local products safe on trucking and carbon emission.
I believe that a road would save on carbon emissions. I do not know how much the ferries emit, but it is a fair amount. Direct ferries to Saltery Bay and Comox will reduce a huge amount, and free up traffic on our roads. A toll road would allow any amount of people in each car, public transport would be much easier with buses every hour.
The Sunshine Coast will always have the outdoorsy lifestyle, because of its location, climate and people that want to live here.
The local municipalities regulate the growth.
I have one vote, you have one, I think we can find a way that enable the local businesses and way of life to sustain, and the coast will not become a bedroom community to Vancouver just because of the distance that will still be the same. Oddvin

Mary:

As a 4th generation Vancouver Islander I find your comment “Islands No More” to be quite horrendous. We do NOT need more pavement connecting the Islands or less accessible coastal communities. This will NOT increase ‘economic activities’ – hogwash. It will destroy the unique character of locations that you clearly know nothing about. If you want more access to more people – move to Vancouver. If you want cheaper ferry fares – lobby the government to take our ferries back from their corporate friends. Paving paradise and turning Island communities into Vancouver burbs is NOT the solution.

Thank you Mary. I am a newcomer to the coast arriving in 1966. I have the same passionate love for the coast and the Island as you.
What happened on Prince Edward Island when they got their bridge I would like to know
I can assure you that your normal way of life would not notice any change at all. Food, gods and services should cost less.
The Province should save money.
The golfcourse might get some more greenfee players, but that can be regulated with members only hours.
Your Paradise will be the same, but if you had to travel, or get visitors from the grandchildren, it would be very much simpler.
Local by-laws regulate any development, and I could go on to try to reassure you, if you want to listen.
Have a nice day, sorry I made you upset. Oddvin

Luke:

Luke says:

Currently, my wife and I (late 20s/early 30s) would live in Gibsons, but for the connection by ferry to the mainland, and my work downtown. There is no viable option for us currently, however when we previously lived in Gibsons we were active in the community and enjoyed the lifestyle very much. Still trying to figure out how we get back to live, but it looks unlikely at this point.

A roadway would substantially change the situation. We would most likely buy a house and be part of the community. Looks like it’d be roughly 80-90 km from Gibsons to downtown Vancouver (checking with Google maps), if the Porteau Cove crossing was used. That’s an excellent distance – far enough that the trip would have to be an intentional one for visitors (I believe therefore maintaining some of the ‘removed’ vibe that Coasters love) but still achievable in terms of a commute, or a trip downtown for other reasons. Ultimately, it’d be probably a 55-60 min drive, vs the approx. 1hr45m that’s need to allow for lining up, boarding, crossing and drive to downtown currently. That’s a huge difference!

HWY    Support:

I live on the sunshine coast with my wife and 1 year old son and I am fully supportive of a connector to Vancouver. Over the last year, we have been contemplating moving because the ferries are expensive and unreliable, the demographic is heavily weighted towards retirees (which is not necessarily a bad thing but does limit the diversity within this community), the job market is terrible, and the “small town” schools are notorious for bullying and heavy drug abuse and lack the resources to meet the needs of some of the kids who are challenged to meet the requirements of the system, which for us as new parents is very concerning. We love the coast for what it is (beaches, trails, quaint little stores etc.) but are uncertain of our future here for the reasons above. We are not the only ones. A connector would help immensely.

I have admit it’s painful to read some of the insulting comments on this idea when it’s just someone’s opinion. To me, this arrogant “no change”, “keep the Sunshine Coast the way it is” attitude is a huge downfall and I believe will only hurt us in the long-run and not to mention is extremely rude (which is what we as Coasters are becoming known for). As Oddvin has correctly and respectfully pointed out several times, preventing unnecessary sprawl and big box stores (BTW, isn’t there already an application for a Walmart in Sechelt?) from taking over the Sunshine Coast comes through a sound planning process that establishes zoning, by-laws and OCP’s to ensure that form, character, and density objectives established by the community are met.

Yes, a Sunshine Coast connector would bring change to this community, but I believe it would be a change that would attract more young people, industry, and culture and would make our beautiful Sunshine Coast a better place to live.

Thank You, thank you ! Oddvin

2014-04-09  Mac:  I would like to clarify that I am not a nay-sayer to this project but that I have spent many hours in our back country here on the Coast and spent time with others looking for a goat trail of any kind linking to the mainland. I just don’t think it is logistically possible.
The connection to the mainland is doable but the problem lies in where to go once you get here.
Expanding the current highway can’t be done due to the proximity of structures along this route. There is just no room to widen it. Building a new road along the power lines would be way too expensive. Take a drive up Selma Park Rd. to Reservoir Rd. and have a look and this one deep gully to cross Chapman Creek. this bridge alone would be in the millions. That’s just one gully and there are several. Any other upper route would be covered in snow for 4-5 months of the year and not an option.
What to do when you get to Sechelt? The viaduct idea is logical but where would you put it. Looking into the third floor of the Watermark? Go over houses on Mermaid? Due to the fact that the SCRD can’t continue their SunCoaster Trail do to the “No Change” people, how will anyone ever get a road over their houses?
I would be on board with this project if someone could come up with a logical solution to “Where to go when you get here”…Food for thought.

Good point. Until we solve these problems, run ferries directly Horseshoe Bay to Saltery Bay and Comox. This will take much of the traffic off the lower Sunshine Coast. Deep gullies are relative easy crossings, and much of the highway can be improved as is. Once the engineers get going, they will find a way. Oddvin

Third Crossing Society Links. (Powell River)

http://snk.to/f-cdp3qk9t

http://snk.to/f-cdniepmh

http://snk.to/f-ctu9aunx

These links should(?) take you to some samples of our little paper. Called “The Hulk”. Its a reference to the WWII concrete ships moored locally to form a break water. We are what one usually calls a coffee shop type paper. We distribute about 2000 issues a month.

 

 

 

 

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16 Responses to Comments

  1. IT’S ALL ABOUT ACCESS! There is a great need to diversify the economy out and away from the lower mainland of Vancouver and along highway 1. Connecting the mainland with the mainland makes good economic, environmental and social sense. I also encourage you to consider the concept of the Third Crossing Society. Their proposal is to connect hiway 99 near Squamish overland to hiway 101 near Powell River. There exists 170 km of logging roads which would require upgrading to hiway standards. Then is needed construction of 30 km of new road including a 3 km tunnel. This proposed roadway would then connect with the recently upgraded ferry terminals at WESTVIEW (Powell River) and Little River (Comox) to complete the third crossing between Vancouver Island and the mainland. See http://www.thirdcrossingsociety.com. IT’S ALL ABOUT ACCESS!

  2. Oddvin says:

    thank you. My proposal would be a new highway to Agemenmon Channel, bridge to Nelson-Hardy and a floating bridge to Scotch Fir Point Area. This way the upper coast is connected. The connection to Vancouver Island I would suggest Texeda, Lasqueti, Hornby, with a concrete floating and submerged bridge.to get one ferry free connection.

  3. All access to or through our coastal communities would be wonderful I’m sure. What the Third Crossing Society hope to achieve with their concept of an overland road to connect between the North Sunshine Coast and the mainland at Squamish/Brekenridge is a transportation corridor between Vancouver Island and the Interior traveling the Duffy Lake to highway 1. ~~~ T W

  4. Mary says:

    As a 4th generation Vancouver Islander I find your comment “Islands No More” to be quite horrendous. We do NOT need more pavement connecting the Islands or less accessible coastal communities. This will NOT increase ‘economic activities’ – hogwash. It will destroy the unique character of locations that you clearly know nothing about. If you want more access to more people – move to Vancouver. If you want cheaper ferry fares – lobby the government to take our ferries back from their corporate friends. Paving paradise and turning Island communities into Vancouver burbs is NOT the solution.

    • Oddvin says:

      Thank you Mary. I am a newcomer to the coast arriving in 1966. I have the same passionate love for the coast and the Island as you.
      What happened on Prince Edward Island when they got their bridge I would like to know
      I can assure you that your normal way of life would not notice any change at all. Food, gods and services should cost less.
      The Province should save money.
      The golfcourse might get some more greenfee players, but that can be regulated with members only hours.
      Your Paradise will be the same, but if you had to travel, or get visitors from the grandchildren, it would be very much simpler.
      Local by-laws regulate any development, and I could go on to try to reassure you, if you want to listen.
      Have a nice day, sorry I made you upset. Oddvin

  5. ConcernedCoaster says:

    Having grown up on the Sunshine Coast, I must say that I vehemently oppose the concept of having any sort of “connector” to the true mainland. There are a number of reasons for why I feel this way… It would result in a rapid economic transition on the Sunshine Coast, yes, this could include financial profits, but at what cost? Housing prices will soar, big box stores will eliminate small, local businesses, and the entire feel of the region will change. Secondly, increased vehicle traffic to the Sunshine Coast and a lengthened drive to travel the journey will have a significant increase in CO2 emissions, thereby contributing to climate change. Lastly, the social dynamic of the Sunshine Coast would change. Ultimately, if people want an outdoorsy lifestyle with access to the city, they can achieve this through living in places like Squamish. People know what they’re committing to when moving to the Sunshine Coast and should realise that with this moves comes ferries and restricted travel. This is what keeps the Coast what it is – a healthy, vibrant, and close-knit community.

    • Oddvin says:

      Thank you Concerned Coaster, you express very well the arguments against a road connection that I expected.
      I like to respond for the sake of discussion. 30 years ago I felt I knew almost everybody on the ferries, now I seldom see anybody I know.
      But I see locals going to town to do major purchases at Box stores in town. We should all support the local stores, yes, pay a little more, but you have a local store to do refunds and repairs. Food products is very important to purchase locally, mostly right at the farm gate. Fish from the dock sales. Use the Farmers Markets. Everything you find of local products safe on trucking and carbon emission.
      I believe that a road would save on carbon emissions. I do not know how much the ferries emit, but it is a fair amount. Direct ferries to Saltery Bay and Comox will reduce a huge amount, and free up traffic on our roads. A toll road would allow any amount of people in each car, public transport would be much easier with buses every hour.
      The Sunshine Coast will always have the outdoorsy lifestyle, because of its location, climate and people that want to live here.
      The local municipalities regulate the growth.
      I have one vote, you have one, I think we can find a way that enable the local businesses and way of life to sustain, and the coast will not become a bedroom community to Vancouver just because of the distance that will still be the same.

  6. Sam says:

    I live on the Sunshine Coast and have lived here for last four years. I thought I would be OK with Ferry travel but am finding it is more of a pain than I imagined. We are contemplating moving off again because of dealing with the ferry situation. I would most gladly pay a toll for as much or even a bit more than the ferry costs if I could get on and off the coast when I wanted.
    If I need to travel outside of Vancouver, the day is almost half over before I can even get on and off the ferry and through the valley. There are a lot of people here on the Sunshine Coast that live all along the water and use their homes for summer homes or weekend get aways from Vancouver or elsewhere. I think a lot of these people like the degree of seclusion that comes with having no road and having to take a ferry. Money isnt an object for many of these people as they live in the most expensive homes and property on the coast. The ferry system is a means to keep the way of life the same for them but these are not the people who truly live here on a year round basis and have to deal with the ferries 12 months a year.
    I think if one was to get the comments from the majority of the working people here that have families here they would love to see a connector to Vancouver. The Ferry system is a cost that will never go away and will only get more expensive and likely less service as the costs increase. A connector with a toll that pays for itself is in my opinion one that makes a lot of sense. Yes, it may change things a bit over time but change always isnt a bad thing. Change happens in all communities as time goes on and many would not be happy to see things go back to yesterday.

    • Oddvin says:

      Thank you Sam for the support. There are many more in your situation, and many have left the coast for the same reason.
      A connector is the only long term solution, and it will come. Oddvin

  7. JIm says:

    My Gosh,
    Just found your web site and was absolutely thrilled. I can’t remember who said it, maybe Einstein, but if he had a choice between knowledge or imagination, imagination would win out.
    This makes sense and I know we would keep our wonderful community intact. The “complainers”, in my opinion, do not want to share our way of life with anyone……almost a NIMBY type of attitude…..they just want to be hoarders.
    Just think that if we made this bit of paradise just a little more assessable, other people may want to raise their families here. Just think that the streets may have children on them again. Just think that with an increase in our tax base from new business we may finally have some affordable social housing. Just think, we may actually have a vibrant community, employment, theatre for the mind and restaurants for the body and “mindfulness” of what we have we should share for the soul.
    I would love to help in any way that I can.
    Thanks

    • Oddvin says:

      Thank you. I also love the coast, and all it gives. But the main artery (BC Ferries) is clogged, and the only solution as I see it is a four lane highway connector and bypass to Powell River, together with a suitable bridge.

  8. Christine says:

    I would absolutely love to see this proposal go through… However, I feel it is impairative to get all facts straight in pursuing this venture. My husband works with large infrastructure construction companies and the Ministry of Transportation. In discussing the Massey Tunnel, the building of the Coast Connector will not come in place of…it is already approved and cited to move forward. Contractors are in the stages of bidding on the project so it will not be reversed…
    Are you in touch with Ryan Medd? He is also working on a campaign to promote a connector to Squamish or a road and bridge option further down the Sea to Sky hwy.
    Christine Turner

  9. Connie Nordli says:

    I think it would be great, have lived here for 35 years, and would love to have access to Vancouver to go to shows etc and be able to come home and sleep in my own bed. People hate change, and then after the change they go……….”we should of done it sooner” Yes please build bridges, tunnels what ever it take to get rid of the ferries!

    • Oddvin says:

      Thank you for your support
      our goal is not to get rid of the ferries, we will need them for many island locations for ever, but the Coast can be better served with connector. After all, we are part of the mainland, not an island.
      We also want a fast passenger ferry only from Langdale to downtown Vancouver.

  10. Elena says:

    Hi all,

    I went to an open house in West Vancouver tonight. It was really good meeting and talking to other people who are pro and contra for the link. I also talked to MLA Jordan Sturdy. He seems to be for the link and he needs to hear your opinion!! He needs to know the public opinion to act! Please go to the open houses and spread your thoughts!!!

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